Insect Walk with Spencer Hardy

Kick off our Community Day Celebration with biologist Spencer Hardy, Project Coordinator of the Vermont Bee Atlas.

Come explore this summer morning and discover what birds and insects share our landscape.

Outdoors—it’s where the bugs and butterflies are!

This is a slow-paced walk; museum trails are open until sunset for those wanting to wander further.

Max: 10 people
Free (as part of our Community Day; donations always welcome)
PLEASE pre-register.


Click/tap the button above or call 802-434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org.

More about Spencer: https://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/spencer-hardy/

Through the Window: August 2021

Common Yellowthroat (life size woodcarving) surround by autumn leaves.
Common Yellowthroat, carved by Bob Spear for the Teaching Warbler collection

We continued to be light on the feeding this month, as we tried to do our bit to reduce or limit the spread of the mysterious disease we’d heard of—encouraging the equivalent of “social distancing” for birds. This disease had not been reported in Vermont. By the end of the month, we had resumed a very limiting feeding schedule. Continue reading “Through the Window: August 2021”

Nature Walk with Spencer Hardy [ FULL ]

 

Come out this summer morning and discover what birds and insects share our landscape. Walk led by biologist Spencer Hardy, Project Coordinator of the Vermont Bee Atlas.

$5 per person (Free for Museum members)

Max: 5 people • Walk is FULL, waitlist available 
Masks: bring them; required when within 6 feet of each other
MUST pre-register. Call 802-434-2167 / email museum@birdsofvermont.org.

More about Spencer: https://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/spencer-hardy/

 

Through the Window: August 2019

teaching warblers
Teaching warblers: half of the set carved by Bob Spear.

Summer is nests and fledglings, flowers and pollinators, greens and golds and more. Young birds come to the feeders, squawk … and sometimes get ignored by their parents! Hummingbirds defend the feeders and the bee balm; some hawk moths get mistaken for hummingbirds. The forest canopy is thick and provides deep cover for the warblers and more. It’s a rich and beautiful time. Who needs a feeder, with so much to eat in the forest?

No one, really, but some come anyway:

Continue reading “Through the Window: August 2019”

Through the Window: July 2019

Adult Common Grackle tends its juvenile while a Rose-breasted Grosbeak looks on.
Adult Common Grackle tends its juvenile while a Rose-breasted Grosbeak looks on.

By July, the birds get pretty busy with nestlings, fledglings, and juveniles.  A few juveniles of one kind of another come to the feeders, and fuss at their parents to keep on feeding them.

Here are the species seen at the feeders over the last month. Sometimes we can even tell when the bird is a juvenile!

Continue reading “Through the Window: July 2019”