Museum Open for Great Backyard Bird Count

Great Backyard Bird Count 2020: poster

Visit us February 15th, 2020,  to see what birds we’re counting for the Great Backyard Bird Count!

  • Learn to ID birds — what do we look / listen for?
  • Go birding with a friend — twice the fun
  • Find out more about –and record observations for–this great citizen science project!

We’re open from 10-3 on Saturday for the GBBC
Members admission: Free!  • Regular Museum admission is $7 adults, discounts for kids and seniors

About the GBBC:

Friday – Monday,  February 14 – 17, 2020 • All Over the World

From the Great Backyard Bird Count website:

Launched in 1998 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, the Great Backyard Bird Count was the first online citizen-science project to collect data on wild birds and to display results in near real-time.

Since then, more than 100,000 people of all ages and walks of life have joined the four-day count each February to create an annual snapshot of the distribution and abundance of birds.

For more info: http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Journal and Sketch (Winter Birds series, episode 4)

nature journaling and sketching materials

Join with others who are interested in birds at a series of four weekly sessions at the Birds of Vermont Museum. The sessions will be held on Wednesdays at 1:30. A donation of $5 is suggested. No prior experience or knowledge needed.

REGISTER WITH janevossler@gmail.com

If you’re interested in attending, there may be carpooling from the Richmond Library.

After the sessions, watch birds at the museum’s feeders while enjoying a hot drink, a snack and the conversation of your fellow bird enthusiasts.

January 22: In this introduction to winter birds, the focus will be on answering the following questions: Which birds are you likely to see in Vermont in the winter? What are the secrets of feeding birds to attract a variety of species? What is Project Feeder Watch and how can you get involved?

January 29: Learn all about Snow Buntings through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? What are their courtship practices? How do they care for their young? Where are you most likely to see them? And more!

February 5: This session will focus on the life of Kinglets through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? How can a bird that small survive the winter? Where are you most likely to see them? Courtship, care of young, and more!

February 12: Learn how to use journaling and nature sketching help you identify birds. When you spot a bird only briefly, what do you look for in the first second that will help you know what to look for in the next second? Also how to participate with join the Great Backyard Bird Count and other Citizen Science Projects.

Kinglets (Winter Birds series, episode 3)

Golden-crowned Kinglet, carved by Bob Spear. Photograph © copyright E. Talmage for the Birds of Vermont Museum

Join with others who are interested in birds at a series of four weekly sessions at the Birds of Vermont Museum. The sessions will be held on Wednesdays at 1:30. A donation of $5 is suggested. No prior experience or knowledge needed.

REGISTER WITH janevossler@gmail.com

If you’re interested in attending, there may be carpooling from the Richmond Library.

After the sessions, watch birds at the museum’s feeders while enjoying a hot drink, a snack and the conversation of your fellow bird enthusiasts.

January 22: In this introduction to winter birds, the focus will be on answering the following questions: Which birds are you likely to see in Vermont in the winter? What are the secrets of feeding birds to attract a variety of species? What is Project Feeder Watch and how can you get involved?

January 29: Learn all about Snow Buntings through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? What are their courtship practices? How do they care for their young? Where are you most likely to see them? And more!

February 5: This session will focus on the life of Kinglets through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? How can a bird that small survive the winter? Where are you most likely to see them? Courtship, care of young, and more!

February 12: Learn how to use journaling and nature sketching help you identify birds. When you spot a bird only briefly, what do you look for in the first second that will help you know what to look for in the next second? Also how to participate with join the Great Backyard Bird Count and other Citizen Science Projects.

Image: Golden-crowned Kinglet, carved by Bob Spear. Photograph © copyright E. Talmage for the Birds of Vermont Museum.

Snow Buntings (Winter Birds series, episode 2)

Snow Bunting, carved by Bob Spear, 1999.

Join with others who are interested in birds at a series of four weekly sessions at the Birds of Vermont Museum. The sessions will be held on Wednesdays at 1:30. A donation of $5 is suggested. No prior experience or knowledge needed.

REGISTER WITH janevossler@gmail.com

If you’re interested in attending, there may be carpooling from the Richmond Library.

After the sessions, watch birds at the museum’s feeders while enjoying a hot drink, a snack and the conversation of your fellow bird enthusiasts.

January 22: In this introduction to winter birds, the focus will be on answering the following questions: Which birds are you likely to see in Vermont in the winter? What are the secrets of feeding birds to attract a variety of species? What is Project Feeder Watch and how can you get involved?

January 29: Learn all about Snow Buntings through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? What are their courtship practices? How do they care for their young? Where are you most likely to see them? And more!

February 5: This session will focus on the life of Kinglets through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? How can a bird that small survive the winter? Where are you most likely to see them? Courtship, care of young, and more!

February 12: Learn how to use journaling and nature sketching help you identify birds. When you spot a bird only briefly, what do you look for in the first second that will help you know what to look for in the next second? Also how to participate with join the Great Backyard Bird Count and other Citizen Science Projects.

Intro to Winter birds (Winter Birds series, episode 1)

Snow-covered wooden bird in the Museum's rain garden

Join with others who are interested in birds at a series of four weekly sessions at the Birds of Vermont Museum. The sessions will be held on Wednesdays at 1:30. A donation of $5 is suggested. No prior experience or knowledge needed.

REGISTER WITH our Eventbrite link or email janevossler@gmail.com

If you’re interested in attending, there may be carpooling from the Richmond Library.

After the sessions, watch birds at the museum’s feeders while enjoying a hot drink, a snack and the conversation of your fellow bird enthusiasts.

January 22: In this introduction to winter birds, the focus will be on answering the following questions: Which birds are you likely to see in Vermont in the winter? What are the secrets of feeding birds to attract a variety of species? What is Project Feeder Watch and how can you get involved?

January 29: Learn all about Snow Buntings through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? What are their courtship practices? How do they care for their young? Where are you most likely to see them? And more!

February 5: This session will focus on the life of Kinglets through carvings, photos, audio, and literature. How do they build their nests? How can a bird that small survive the winter? Where are you most likely to see them? Courtship, care of young, and more!

February 12: Learn how to use journaling and nature sketching help you identify birds. When you spot a bird only briefly, what do you look for in the first second that will help you know what to look for in the next second? Also how to participate with join the Great Backyard Bird Count and other Citizen Science Projects.

Through the Window: December 2019

Red-breasted Nuthatch. Carved by Bob Spear in the early 1960s.
Red-breasted Nuthatch. Carved by Bob Spear in the early 1960s.

We’ve enjoyed welcoming some new birders to our monthly bird monitoring walks. This more than makes up for the quiet of the winter species counts at our a Viewing Window. These walks are the last Saturday of every month. We record those observations over on eBird.

Before you head over there, though, enjoy this short but sweet December window observation list. What’s your favorite of the species listed here? How come ?

Continue reading “Through the Window: December 2019”

the Big Sit!

several birders standing during a Big Sit event

The most relaxed birding around. And around and around …
How many birds can we identify from a 17-foot diameter circle?
Can we beat last year’s record? Join Team Loonatics and find out.

Free! Pledges and donations welcome. Snacks and coffee provided. Please bring your own binoculars.

Sign up to join us from Dawn to Dusk. Or just drop by.

For much more info, see http://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/connect/bigsit/about.php
or our report from last year ( https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/ bwdsite/ connect/ bigsit/ bigsit-2018/ stats.php?find_type=circle&find=BOVM )