Early Birders Morning Walk

Baltimore oriole from below: an orange and black songbird with a white belly, seen from below while perched on small tree branches. Seen from below against a bright blue sky.

Late spring mornings are terrific for birding. 

Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15
Register here (tap the button below) or call the museum




Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills

Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

Two people stand on a footbridge looking through binoculars; one is pointing at something out of frame. Trees with spring foliage can be seen behind them.

Early Birders Morning Walk

Eastern Phoebe (small gray and white songbird), holding nesting material while perched on thin twig. Photo copyright 2020 Morgan Barnes and used with permission.

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. 

Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15



Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills

Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

4 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

The photo of the Eastern Phoebe holding nesting material is copyright © 2020 Morgan Barnes and used with permission.

May Bird Monitoring Walk

Birders in early spring, looking at trees that are not fully leafed out.

All birders (current, experienced, newbie and would-be!) welcome! Attend our monthly monitoring walk outdoors on the Museum’s trails in forest and meadow.

Most fun for adults, older children. Please bring your own binoculars, dress for weather. Tick repellent and water bottles are recommended.

Max: 12 people
Suggested donation $10 – $15



Face masks recommended inside the museum.
We go out the last Saturday of every month. Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March.

Early Birders Morning Walk

Silhouette of thrush on a branch with green foliage in background.

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week, Nate Sharp from VCE leads the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15
Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills


Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

4 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

Photograph of thrush copyright © 2007 J. Comeau and used by permission.

Early Birders Morning Walk

Museum members on a bird walk

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week, Ali Wagner will be leading the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15
Max: 12 people • waitlist available



Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

5 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

Early Birders Morning Walk

Photo of Catbird surrounded by green foliage. copyright J. Comeau and used by permission.

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Join us for a walk led by experienced birders.

Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week Becky Giroux will be leading the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15



Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills

Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

4 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

April Bird Monitoring Walk

Photo: Fox Sparrow photographed by Erin Talmage, © 2019 and used by permission.

All birders —current, experienced, newbie and would-be— welcome! Most fun for adults, older children.

Please bring your own binoculars and dress for the weather. We recommend bringing tick repellent and a water bottle. Face masks required inside the museum.

Max: 10 people
Free, suggested donation $5 – $10 (pay what you can)




Outdoors

We go out the last Saturday of every month.. Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March

Photo: Fox Sparrow photographed by Erin Talmage, ©copyright  2019 and used by permission.

March Bird Monitoring Walk

Bohemian Waxwing in Museum's crab apple tree, by Erin Talmage. Copyright 2016 and used by permission.

Join our monthly monitoring walk to record birds at the Museum’s trails, forest, and meadow. Learn something new, share what you know, or both!

All birders —current, experienced, newbie and would-be— welcome! Most fun for adults, older children.

Please bring your own binoculars and dress for the weather. We recommend bringing tick repellent and a water bottle. Face masks required inside the museum.

Max: 10 people
Free, suggested donation $5 – $15


Outdoors

If the walk fills, we’ll have a waitlist; when there’s enough interest, we often can schedule more walks. Please call or email us to make arrangements.

(Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March)

Photo: Bohemian Waxwing in Museum’s crab apple tree, by Erin Talmage. Copyright 2016 and used by permission.

February Bird Monitoring Walk

Northern Cardinal female. ©2011 Laura Waterhouse

Join our monthly monitoring walk to record birds at the Museum’s trails, forest, and meadow. Learn something new, share what you know, or both!

All birders —current, experienced, newbie and would-be— welcome! Most fun for adults, older children.

Please bring your own binoculars and dress for the weather. We recommend bringing tick repellent and a water bottle. Face masks required inside the museum.

Max: 10 people
Free, suggested donation $5 – $15




Outdoors

If the walk fills, we’ll have a waitlist; when there’s enough interest, we often can schedule more walks. Please call or email us to make arrangements.

(Photo: Female Northern Cardinal. Used by permission of the photographer.)

January Bird Monitoring Walk

Black-capped Chickadee and Dark-eyed Junco in winter. The Chickadee is perched on a half-fallen dried goldenrod stem on the left; the Junco is underneath he stem on the right. There are some forsythia stems in the background and snow covers the ground. Digiscoped iPhone photo by K. Talmage and used by permission.

Join our monthly monitoring walk to record birds at the Museum’s trails, fores,t and meadow. Learn something new, share what you know, or both!

All birders —current, experienced, newbie and would-be— welcome! Most fun for adults, older children.

Please bring your own binoculars and dress for the weather. We recommend bringing tick repellent and a water bottle. Face masks required inside the museum.

Max: 10 people
Free, suggested donation $5 – $15



Register online with the button above or call 802 434-2167.
Outdoors

If the walk fills, we’ll have a waitlist; when there’s enough interest, we often can schedule more walks. Please call or email us to make arrangements.

Photo of Black-capped Chickadee and Junco in winter. Photographed at the Museum by Museum staff.