Early Birders’ Observations for May 8, 2016

The Early Birders Morning Walk results are in two parts today, first from the walk (thanks to M. Patenaude!) and then from coffee klatch and viewing from indoors. What a delight it is to have so many birds around and about.

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 May 8, 2016 7:00 AM - 8:45 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Early Birders Walk led by Michele Patenaude
 23 species
 
 Ruffed Grouse  1
 Cooper's Hawk  1
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
 Downy Woodpecker  4
 Hairy Woodpecker  1
 Northern Flicker  1
 Eastern Phoebe  2
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  5
 American Crow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  11
 Tufted Titmouse  3
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
 American Robin  1
 Ovenbird  6
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
 Pine Warbler  2
 White-throated Sparrow  4
 Song Sparrow  3
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  1
 American Goldfinch  3
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29482149
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 May 8, 2016 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
 Protocol: Stationary
 Comments:     Feeder window birds following the bird walk
 21 species

 Mourning Dove  3
 Downy Woodpecker  2
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  3
 Tufted Titmouse  2
 American Robin  1
 European Starling  2
 Chipping Sparrow  2
 Dark-eyed Junco  1
 White-crowned Sparrow  1
 White-throated Sparrow  1
 Song Sparrow  1
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  4
 Red-winged Blackbird  8
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  3
 Purple Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  14

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29484299

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for one or more of these, Sundays in May and June. Greet the day with birders, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Woodcocks and Owls

Guest post by our friend and expert birder, AW.

Sunday evening, following a spring time ritual, I walked from Moody Road to Maple Drive at dusk in hopes of hearing American Woodcocks and seeing their flight display. Mid-March is when they start to come back to their breeding territories. I did not find any evidence of them this time, but I was surprised to hear another bird calling from the woods west of the Huntington River and the Camel’s Hump Alpaca farm fields. In the 10+ years I’ve been walking this route, it was only the second time I’ve heard a Northern Saw Whet tooting persistently from the woods. February 14, 2012 was the other time I heard one in nearly the same place, leaving me to wonder if it is a resident bird! Nice!

Open Museum for the Great Backyard Bird Count 2016

Drop by the Museum for the Great Backyard Bird Count! We’re open Saturday, February 13 • 10am – 3pm to share the Count with you!

Share the Great Backyward Bird Count with friends, family, and the Birds of Vermont Museum

  • New to the count? We can tell you about it and help you participate.
  • Need to warm up from your outdoor excursion with Audubon Vermont? Do so from the comfort of our viewing window chairs.
  • Seen a great bird and want to let us know? Sounds good!
  • Need help identifying a bird? From apps to field guides, we can help. You’ll need to know your fieldmarks, though! (And we can help with that, too)
  • Want to have fun? You bet!

See you here!

More about the GBBC: http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Zoo Bird Group Master List from 1945

One of our staff members recently came across this bird list from 1945. Can anyone provide us with some information about this? It most likely belonged to one of her grandparents, a resident of the Bronx in 1945. Do you think it referred to New York resident and/or migrants visible from the Bronx Zoo? Was there a group that met at the zoo and birded from there? Can you spot the birds whose names have been revised since then?

Here’s a scan of the pages (a click will show each larger, or you can download the PDF) and the text is below.

Zoo Bird Group Master List for 1945 Spring Migration (page 1) Zoo Bird Group Master List for 1945 Spring Migration (page 2)

Continue reading “Zoo Bird Group Master List from 1945”

The Bird Carver’s Daughter (Part 10: Canoe Lessons)

Guest post by Kari Jo Spear, Photographer, Novelist, and Daughter of Bob Spear
This post appeared first in our Late Fall 2015  issue of
Chip Notes.

Reprinted by permission.

In one thing, my father and I were always in perfect accord. He may have dragged me kicking and screaming into the world of birding, but I always loved to canoe. From the time I was old enough to reach over the gunwale, I had a paddle in my hands. My first one was a blue plastic badminton racquet attached to a thwart with a string. I paddled my little heart out with it, stirring up white water and getting soaking wet while my father paddled serenely along in the stern. I always wondered why everybody laughed when they saw us coming.

When I was old enough to graduate to a wooden paddle, my father had me sit in the bow. I’d hardly learned the basic strokes when he put me in the stern and took the bow himself.

“Wait, this is where you steer from,” I said.

“Yeah,” he said and demonstrated the J-stroke.

Surprisingly, it was really easy to make the canoe go where I wanted it to, unlike riding a bike, or doing math. My father preferred to hug the shoreline (watching for shorebirds wasn’t enough for him—he wanted to see warblers, too.) I ran him into a few low hanging limbs at first, but he didn’t mind, even when they had spiders (which always seemed to find their way back along the length of the canoe to my bare toes).

Soon he began giving me complex directions like, “Bring us in sideways next to that log. Back up a little. Hold it right there.” It took me a while to notice he wasn’t paddling—he was looking through his binoculars into the trees. Huh.

Once I got really good at steering, he taught me how to paddle without taking the paddle out of the water. “It’s the way the Indians used to do it,” he said. “You don’t make any noise at all. Take a regular stroke and then sort of glide the paddle up ahead of you through the water, angled a little. That’s it.”

My paddle slid through the water like a silent knife, completely eliminating the plunk of the blade breaking the surface and the silvery rain of drops coming off the edge when it swept forward. I imagined Indians sneaking up on their enemies, soundless in the night.

“Works great to get close to a heron,” my father said.

That, too.

The first time I ever paddled solo was on a field trip. There were seven or eight canoes, and we spent the day making our way down Otter Creek. We had spotted a car where we planned to take out. The problem was we couldn’t see the road from the creek. By late afternoon, everyone was tired, hot, hungry, sunburned, bug bitten, sick of sitting, and had to pee (at least, I did). But we couldn’t find the car. A discussion broke out over whether we’d passed it, or if it was still ahead. My father told everybody to rest in the shade, and he’d go on downstream a ways. Since I was paddling with him, that meant me, too. So we kept going. And going. And going.

My father didn’t usually get lost (except in the mall parking lot) and pretty soon he was frowning. At last, he told me to land us on a tiny strip of sand and he’d walk across a field, find the road, and look around for the car that had to be somewhere nearby. I waited about fifteen minutes, and then I heard him shout from a long distance farther down the creek that he’d found the car, and to save time, I should paddle back and get the others.

I yelled back that I would. And then the canoe got a whole lot bigger and heavier and kind of scary. He’d told me the best place to paddle solo was kneeling in the center   with the boat facing the other way around, going stern first. That kept the canoe level. So I climbed into the center and knelt down, resting my butt on the edge of a thwart, and pushed off. I felt like I was paddling through molasses, until I remembered I was going against the current. Not to mention I was dead tired. But I was used to being the only one paddling a good deal of the time while he was birding, so soon I had some momentum going. I kept close to shore, and after a while, my heart rate settled back down.

At long last, the other canoes came into sight, nosed into shore where a collection of people who looked like they were shipwreck survivors were collapsed in the shade. They saw me coming, and someone shouted, “Oh my God, where’s your father?” They were jumping up like they thought he’d fallen overboard and had been eaten by a giant snapping turtle just because I was a kid paddling alone.

I yelled back, “He walked  He says keep coming.”

As they piled back into their canoes, someone asked if I wanted a bow paddler. I shook my head, turned the canoe on a dime, and started paddling Indian style back downstream.

I had this—no problem.

 

Kari Jo Spear‘s young adult, urban fantasy novels, Under the Willow, and  Silent One, are available at Phoenix Books (in Essex and Burlington, Vermont), and on-line at Amazon and Barnes and Noble

Previous posts in this series:
Part 1: The Early Years
Part 2: The Pre-teen Years (or, Why I’m Not a Carver)
Part 3: Something’s Going On Here
Part 4: The Summer of Pies
Part 5: My Addiction
Part 6: Habitat Shots
Part 7: Growing Up
Part 8: My Dead Arm
Part 9: Remembrance: Tales of My Father

 

Noticed on the October 2015 Monitoring Walk

We’ve not quite been enough in the habit of linking our monthly Monitoring Walk “results”, but we’ll try to keep up with that a bit more.

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Oct 31, 2015 8:00 AM - 8:15 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     monthly monitoring walk led by Erin Talmage.
 13 species
Mourning Dove  6
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  1
 Common Raven  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  16
 Tufted Titmouse  3
 Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
 White-breasted Nuthatch  4
 Brown Creeper  1
 Dark-eyed Junco  5
 American Goldfinch  1
View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25639896
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

June 2015 Bird Monitoring Walk

Director Erin Talmage led the June 2015 Bird Monitoring Walk. These results are recorded with eBird. Erin adds, “We saw lots of babies on the bird walk. It was so cool.”

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     monitoring walk led by Erin Talmage
 30 species
 
 Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  7     
          Observed feeding at 2 very active nesting holes; 
          observed additional feeding of fledgling
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  1
 Northern Flicker  1
 Eastern Phoebe  2
 Great Crested Flycatcher  2
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  1
 Common Raven  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  3
 Tufted Titmouse  1
 White-breasted Nuthatch  1
 Brown Creeper  1
 House Wren  1
 Hermit Thrush  1
 American Robin  1
 Gray Catbird  1
 Ovenbird  7
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  1
 Common Grackle  1
 Baltimore Oriole  1
 
 View this checklist online at
 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24068035
 
 This report was generated automatically by 
 eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the next Bird Monitoring Walk, Saturday July 25, at 7:30 a.m. Gather in the Museum’s parking lot! This activity is open to all and free; we see that’s it’s most fun for adults and older children, and experienced birders help newer ones. Please bring your own binoculars. It’s helpful when you pre-register by emailing museum@birdsofvermont.org or calling (802) 434-2167

Early Birders’ Observations for June 21, 2015

The the second-to-last 2015  Early Birders Morning Walk was was rich in rain and then some more rain. Six dedicated birders noticed 28 species from under hoods and umbrellas, braving damp dirt roads and muddy trails to do so. Thank goodness for beverages and tasty baked goods to help us dry out by the viewing window (where we added a few more species). As she’s done this year so many times, we appreciate Mae Mayville for eBirding the results for us.

 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, US-VT
 Sherman Hollow Road, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Jun 21, 2015 7:00 AM - 8:45 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 0.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Early Birders walk; raining.
 28 species
 
 Mourning Dove  3
 Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
 Downy Woodpecker  2
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Merlin  1
 Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
 Eastern Phoebe  2
 Great Crested Flycatcher  1
 Warbling Vireo  1
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  4
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  3
 American Robin  3
 Gray Catbird  3
 European Starling  2
 Cedar Waxwing  4
 Common Yellowthroat  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
 Song Sparrow  3
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  8
 Common Grackle  3
 Brown-headed Cowbird  2
 Purple Finch  1
 Pine Siskin  1
 American Goldfinch 3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23991964
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the last one this year, June 28! Enjoy the start of the day with us, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Early Birders’ Observations for June 14, 2015

Our Early Birders Morning Walk on June 7 was amazing! Not the highest species count, but possibly the highest birder count. Ali Wagner led the walk (and she will lead the next two also), and she is one terrific birder. Attendees ranged from brand-new to birding to decades of experience.

Thank you again to Mae for eBirding the results.

 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Jun 14, 2015 7:00 AM - 9:30 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     early birders walk
 36 species (+1 other taxa)
 
 Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  5
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Northern Flicker  1
 Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
 Empidonax sp.  1
 Eastern Phoebe  1
 Great Crested Flycatcher  1
 Red-eyed Vireo  4
 Blue Jay  4     No activity at nest previously reported
 American Crow  2
 Common Raven  4
 Black-capped Chickadee  6
 Tufted Titmouse  2
 Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 House Wren  2
 Veery  1
 Hermit Thrush  1
 Wood Thrush  2
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  4
 Cedar Waxwing  3
 Ovenbird  4
 Louisiana Waterthrush  4     Heard vocalizations from young and adult; observed 4
 Common Yellowthroat  3
 American Redstart  1
 Blackburnian Warbler  1
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  3
 Black-throated Green Warbler  2
 Song Sparrow  2
 Dark-eyed Junco  3
 Scarlet Tanager  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  4
 Baltimore Oriole  1
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23902062
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. You can see from our records that we have experienced birders leading the walks (and attending) but beginners are welcome!! Our trails are moderate—plus we have both an accessible tree house and an indoor viewing window if you prefer an even more relaxed pace.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Early Birders’ Observations for June 7, 2015

♪ ♫ “One misty, moisty morning…” when Ali led the bird walk ♪ ♫ , we had several generations of birders and we found thirty-nine species! Thank you again to Mae for eBirding the results for this week’s Early Birders Morning Walk. .

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, US-VT
Jun 7, 2015 7:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 kilometer(s)
39 species

Ruffed Grouse  1
Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  5
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Brown Creeper  2
House Wren  1
Veery  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  3
Louisiana Waterthrush  4     
     2 continually making contact chips and carrying food, 
     2 we thought were fledglings waiting to be fed; 
     all 4 in area where streams come together
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  1
Blackburnian Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  3
Song Sparrow  1
Dark-eyed Junco  1
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  3
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23810800

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. You can see from our records that we have experienced birders leading the walks (and attending) but beginners are welcome!! Our trails are moderate—plus we have both an accessible treehouse and an indoor viewing window if you prefer an even more relaxed pace.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum. Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot. Best for adults and older children.

Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org