Annual Butterfly and Bug Walk

Young Entomologist

Experience Vermont’s butterflies and other insects up close!

Join Vermont Entomological Society naturalists and entomologists for an exploratory stroll on the Birds of Vermont Museum grounds.

Bring binoculars, magnifying glasses, and an insect net if you have one. Pack a lunch if you would like to picnic after the walk. Do bring your water bottle and dress for outdoors.

Registration link coming soon.

Max: 15 people • waitlist available
Masks required when indoors.
(We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions  as we get closer to the date.)

If it is raining on the day of the walk, please call the Museum (802 434-2167) to see if we have rescheduled; probable rain date Sunday, July 10).

Terrific for anyone interested in Vermont’s six-legged creatures.

Free! (Donations welcome)

Check out the Vermont Entomological Society site https://www.vermontinsects.org/ — gorgeous photos and information about the Society.

Fine Feathers, at play with structure and function | 2022 community art show

collage of polaroid photos of submissions to Fine Feathers art show

Our 2022 art show, Fine Feathers, features over 70 works, chosen from over 250 submissions from artists, photographers, and poets. Each piece is inspired by birds and their feathers. The creators are influenced by feather colors, shapes, patterns, and functions. Through illustration, painting, textile, collage, photography, sculpture, and the written word, these creative expressions are as varied as the feathered creatures they depict. Continue reading “Fine Feathers, at play with structure and function | 2022 community art show”

Ask a Naturalist: Ticks, Mosquitos, and Blackflies

A map of Vermont with red dots showing locations of mosquito traps in 2019 in the state.

Local naturalists answer your questions about some small, annoying, yet important invertebrates of Vermont! 

The April session of Ask-a-Naturalist, from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas gives you the chance to learn new and fascinating things about some small creatures we normally just brush off.

Do you know how many different kinds of mosquitoes we have in Vermont? And that some don’t bother humans at all? How about ticks, and when to worry about which diseases? Have you seen “Blackflies: defenders of Vermont” on a T-shirt, and wondered what roles blackflies play in our ecosystems? Join this session and find out more!

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont at https://act.audubon.org/a/ask-a-naturalistmosquitoesticksflies


Bring us your questions and curiosity!

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so because of generous donors. If you can, please donate to one our organizations:

Thank you, and see you soon!

Ask a Naturalist: Amphibians

Red eft (tiny orange salamander) climbing over a single brown pine needle on a forest floor.

Local naturalists answer your questions about amphibians in Vermont! 

The March 2022 session of Ask-a-Naturalist, from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This episode we are excited to share all sort of observations and questions and even answers about some of our favorite animals: salamanders, frogs, and toads.

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont (802 434-3068) or the Museum (802 434-2167) to get the info you need to sign in.

Bring us your questions and curiosity!

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so because of generous donors. If you can, please donate to one our organizations:
Birds of Vermont Museum
Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas
Audubon Vermont

Thank you, and see you soon!

p.s. this event was originally scheduled for March 10th but has been moved to March 16th.

The Great Backyard Bird Count

black-capped chickadee eyes black oil birdseed in the platform feeder in fall-winter

Friday – Monday, February 18-21, 2022 • All Over the World

With a friend or one your own, watching one bird or counting hundreds, join a worldwide community-science and conservation project. All you have to do is observe for 15 minutes and submit your observation(s). Here are few more details from https://www.birdcount.org/participate/ :

Step 1 – Decide where you will watch birds.

Step 2 – Watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over the four days, February 18-21, 2022.

Step 3 – Count all the birds you see or hear within your planned time/location and use the best tool for sharing your bird sightings:

For more info: http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Ask a Naturalist: Owls

Local naturalists answer your questions about owls in Vermont (and possibly beyond)! 

Whooo’s interested in owls? Lots of us! Listen to and ask questions about these astonishing predators. Birders and ornithologists from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas answer your questions.

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont at https://vt.audubon.org/events/ask-naturalist-all-about-owls or call  (802 434-3068) or the Museum (802 434-2167) to get the info you need to sign in.

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions about owl senses, feathers, adaptations, habitat, prey and more are all welcome.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Ask a Naturalist: Bird Feeding and Birds in Winter

Seven Eastern Bluebirds at a water dish. Photo by Dana Ono for/at the Great Backyard Bird Count

Local naturalists answer your questions about birding in winter! 

The next  in the series from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas ! Ask A Naturalist brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This is an online free event; please register with Audubon Vermont at [ Link Coming Soon ].

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions on migration, hibernation, winter, wildlife, etc are all welcome topics.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Call to Artists: Fine Feathers

Fine Feathers:
at play with structure and function

What happens when you mix art, playfulness, and insights from birds? Creativity influenced by feather color and pattern, frills and function! From bower birds to city pigeons, feathers come in thousands of sizes and colors, fantastic shapes, in different seasons, and for many reasons. Which of these emerge in your art? We want to know!
Continue reading “Call to Artists: Fine Feathers”

National Coffee Day

For National Coffee Day, make a commitment to buying and drinking bird-friendly coffee.

Not sure what that is? Start here: https://nationalzoo.si.edu/migratory-birds/bird-friendly-coffee

Enjoy reading (or re-reading) some of these links, too:

There’s a lot more info at Coffee Habitat

International Coffee Day is coming in 2 more days!
https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/coffee-day/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Coffee_Day

International Vulture Awareness Day

Head and neck of Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura), a wood carving by Bob Spear (rest of body not visible in photo)

The first Saturday in September each year is International Vulture Awareness Day.

Vultures are an ecologically vital group of birds that face a range of threats in many areas that they occur. Populations of many species are under pressure and some species are facing extinction. Learn what you can do to protect vultures…and why that’s a really good idea!

Stop by the Museum (we’re open 10am – 4pm) to discover how many vulture species live in Vermont (and where). Can you find all of our vulture carvings? Are we missing any? Check out one of our larger carvings and imagine where would we have had to put it if Bob Spear had carved it with its wings outspread.

Not in Vermont? Drop by the Vulture Day website at https://www.VultureDay.org to stretch your curiosity with resources , games, education activities, and more. Celebrate IVAD locally!

Celebrate Vultures all around the world!

Photo shows life-size wood carving of a California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). The bird has no feathers on its head, but lower neck and body has mostly black feathers. Its lower legs also have no feathers. Behind the bird is a mural showing a landscape of possible California habitat. The carving is by Bob Spear.