Through the Window: November 2015

It’s getting quieter around here… but is that due to the owl?

Bold indicates those we didn’t see last month.

Barred Owl in Feeder Area, November 20 or so. Taken with an iPhone
Barred Owl in Feeder Area, November 20 or so. Taken with an iPhone through hand-held binoculars.
  • Mourning Dove
  • Blue Jay
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Barred Owl (during UVM’s NR1 class field trip, even! Also November 28)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Ruffed Grouse (2 seen and heard early in November. One was found dead near our viewing window on November 15th—a predator, interrupted? A collision? [Although we have netting over the windows to reduce the chances of that.] A grouse was seen in the crabapple tree November 24. This could be the other member of the pair?)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Wild Turkey
  • Buteo spp., possible juvenile Red-tailed Hawk (tail not clearly chestnut)

We also observed Eastern Chipmunks, Red Squirrels, and Gray Squirrels. Didn’t spot the the Raccoons on our nighttime cam. We did hear far-off coyotes while feeding birds or listening to some webcam videos.

Want to watch from our window? Schedule a visit! Call, tweet, phone (802) 434-2167, or email museum@birdsofvermont.org. (Other windows let you observe what’s happening around the new boxes on the hedge or admire the growth of cover crops along the restabilized stream bed (part of the stream restoration and bridge phase of #BridgesToBirds).

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: October 2015

Wow, in this last month of our open-daily season, we recorded some unusual birds! Are they here for the winter? Just passing through? And for some of the common ones, where were they last month?

Bold indicates those we didn’t see last month.

  • Golden-crowned Kinglet (10/1 in cedar hedge*)
  • Mourning Dove
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet (10/2 in cedar hedge)
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Blue Jay
  • American Goldfinch
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Red-tailed Hawk
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Cooper’s Hawk
  • Ruffed Grouse (10/20 in the crabapple tree  and 10/26 2 walking along the feeding zone perimeter and in the crabapple)
  • Northern Cardinal (10/24 m & f, just male on 10/27)
  • Purple finch (10/30)

We also observed Eastern Chipmunks, Red Squirrels, and Gray Squirrels, as well several visits from  Raccoons on our nighttime cam.

* Aside: We’re going to do some extensive trimming and pruning on the cedar hedge. It was deeply damaged by ice and snow earlier this year, and we’re removing much of the dead wood. Other changes include roost, wintering, and nest boxes (for birds and insect pollinators) and new plantings in the spring as well. Thanks to Volunteer EP for his help with this!

Come see for yourself! Call, tweet, email or schedule a visit by phone: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org. From museum exhibits to relaxing in our accessible treehouse to observing the long-awaited progress on the stream restoration and bridge phase of #BridgesToBirds, there’s always some wild thing to learn from or about.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Noticed on the October 2015 Monitoring Walk

We’ve not quite been enough in the habit of linking our monthly Monitoring Walk “results”, but we’ll try to keep up with that a bit more.

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Oct 31, 2015 8:00 AM - 8:15 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     monthly monitoring walk led by Erin Talmage.
 13 species
Mourning Dove  6
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  1
 Common Raven  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  16
 Tufted Titmouse  3
 Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
 White-breasted Nuthatch  4
 Brown Creeper  1
 Dark-eyed Junco  5
 American Goldfinch  1
View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25639896
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Through the Window: September 2015

Fall approached…and arrived. And off went some birds. Thanks to the critter cam we heard some birds that we couldn’t see. Looking forward to the big list coming up for the Big Sit! in just over a week.

Bold indicates those we didn’t see last month.

  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Blue Jay
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • American Goldfinch
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Mourning Dove
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (9/14: 2 skirmishing on cedars. Juveniles or females. No adult males recorded this month.)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler (9/6/15 and 9/13/15)
  • Eastern Phoebe (at the front of the Museum)
  • Song Sparrow (across the road)
  • other Sparrow spp.
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Wild Turkey
  • Barred Owl (heard on the critter cam)
  • American Crow (heard from the front doorway)

We saw a few green frogs in our tiny little pond by the feeder. We also delighted in seeing a White-tailed Deer eating some crab apples near the treehouse, as well as Red Squirrels, a Gray Squirrel, and Eastern Chipmunks under the feeders. Nocturnal ones included raccoons, mice, and again a cat (watching that night-time video is what let us notice the Barred Owl).

Come see for yourself! We’re open every day from 10am until 4pm, through October 31. From museum exhibits to relaxing in our accessible treehouse to observing the long-awaited progress on the stream restoration and bridge phase of #BridgesToBirds. There’s always some wild thing to learn from or about. Call, tweet, email or drop by: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: August 2015

We had a critter cam, sensitive to motion, installed this month. It’s been such a treat to see some of the larger birds at times when we are not at the Museum! It’s also possible that more species were seen—especially by visitors—but not recorded on the noteboard.

Bold indicates those we didn’t see last month.

  • American Goldfinch
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Mourning Dove
  • Blue Jay
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • Wild Turkey (2 juveniles! And more seen after hours with our new critter cam!)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Sharp-shinned Hawk (juvenile?)
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Song Sparrow (and a juvenile on 8/10/2015)
  • Common Grackle
  • Purple Finch
  • Northern Oriole
  • Gray Catbird
  • Hawk spp.
  • Mourning Warbler (8/8, in front of Museum; the same or other warbkler spp seen in feeder area but not identified, ~8/16)
  • American Crow (seen only on the critter cam! They cam every morning around 6 am for several days)

Diurnal mammals included Woodchuck, Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, and Eastern Chipmunks. Nocturnal ones included raccoons, mice, and once a cat.

Two raccoons, some moths, and a glowing strand of bee balm (we think)
Two raccoons, some moths, and a glowing strand of bee balm (we think)

We caught a strange glimpse of a katydid too, looking surprisingly like a mythical creature

Come see for yourself! We’re open every day from 10am until 4pm, through October 31. From museum exhibits to relaxing in our accessible treehouse to a short stroll to the bond: catch some glimpses of maturing fledglings, juveniles and adults as they prepare to migrate or find fall and winter roosting sites. There’s always some wild thing to learn from or about. Come by or get in touch: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: July 2015

To our great surprise, we didn’t see Chickadees. We must have been very busy, or they were, or both. However, we did luck out with the hawks this month. Bold indicates those we didn’t see last month.

  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • Common Grackle
  • Blue Jay
  • Mourning Dove
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  •  Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • American Goldfinch
  • Gray Catbird
  • Evening Grosbeak
  • Turkey Vulture
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch juvenile? (just caught a glimpse)
  • Purple Finch
  • American Robin
  • Red-tailed Hawk (adult and juvenile!)
  • Northern Flicker
  • Sharp-shinned Hawk (taking a chipmunk on 26 July)

Mammal friends were voracious, possibly out-competing the elusive and longer-legged Wild Turkeys to the scattered corn. Gee, thanks, you Woodchuck, Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, and Eastern Chipmunks!

We’re open every day from 10am until 4pm, through October 31. Visit frequently for birds (indoors and out, wooden and wild), trails, treehouse, pond … and restfulness, relaxation, inspiration and new things to learn.  Questions? Let us know: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: June 2015

A mellow month, with most of the species busy nesting and feeding nestlings, so not quite as many as last month. A few juveniles by the end of June though!

  • Hairy Woodpecker (feeding young 6/27)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Mourning Dove
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak (female, male, juvenile 6/30)
  • Blue Jay
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Common Grackle (feeding young 6/27)
  • Gray Catbird
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • American Robin
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • American Crow
  • Northern Cardinal
  • American Goldfinch
  • House Finch (6/10)
  • Merlin (6/21)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped Chickadee

Mammal friends were sometimes even more obvious: Eastern Cottontail rabbit (2 on 6/2), Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, Eastern Chipmunks, Woodchucks. Other winged notables included Canadian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly and Clearwing Sphinx Moth (on the azalea).

We’re open daily! Doors open at 10am until 4pm, every day through October 31. Come often for birds (indoors and out, wooden and wild), trails, treehouse, pond … and restfulness, relaxation, inspiration and new things to learn.   Questions? Let us know: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: May 2015

Thirty species for our first month of the Open Season! (Bold text indicates the species we did not see in March (your blogger has misplaced the April list, how embarrassing!)

  • American Goldfinch
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak (5/2)
  • Brown-headed Cowbird (5/2)
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Eastern Phoebe (out by the front door, not the viewing window)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Mourning Dove
  • Blue Jay
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Evening Grosbeak (female and male 5/3)
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • Song Sparrow (5/3)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Wild Turkey
  • Common Grackle
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • American Crow
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Pileated Woodpecker
  • American Robin
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5/8)
  • Brown Thrasher (5/8)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Baltimore/Northern Oriole
  • Gray Catbird (5/21)
  • European Starling (5/25)
  • Purple Finch

We are of course charmed by mammals, too. These included Eastern Cottontail rabbit (5/31), Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, Eastern Chipmunks, Woodchuck. A few others of delightful note: Canadian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly (5/17), Wood Frog Tadpoles (5/8), Spotted Salamander Egg Masses (5/1).

We’re open daily for the spring/summer/fall! Doors open at 10am until 4pm, every day through October 31. Drop in ! Come several times! Whether you’re working on bird ID skills, want to explore example of the woodcarvers’ art, getting intrigued by birds in art, or seeking citizen science opportunities for yourself or a child, we can help! Call or email to set up your time to visit: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Upcoming events: Bird Monitoring Walks

Get outdoors for spring, Vermont-style!

Join experienced birders on the monthly bird monitoring walk on the Museum’s property. We go out the last Saturday of every month: the next one is March 28, at 8a.m.

Most fun for adults, older children, and somewhat more experienced birders. Please dress for the weather and please bring your own binoculars.

Free! • Please pre-register by email or phone: museum@birdsofvermont.org or (802) 434-2167

The next three walks are:
Saturday, March 28 •  8:00 – 9:45am
Saturday, April 25 •  8:00 – 9:45am
Saturday, May 30 •  7:30 – 9:30am (note the May time change!)

Changes and updates will be posted on our website, at http://birdsofvermont.org/events.php, if needed and when possible.

Upcoming events: Bird Monitoring Walks

Got cabin fever? Free yourself by looking for birds with us!

Join experienced birders on the monthly bird monitoring walk on the Museum’s property. We go out the last Saturday of every month: the next one is February 28, at 8a.m.  AND it’s supposed to be above-zero weather!

Most fun for adults, older children, and somewhat more experienced birders. Please dress for the weather (snowshoes still helpful though not required) and please bring your own binoculars.

Free! • Please pre-register by email or phone: museum@birdsofvermont.org or (802) 434-2167

The next three walks are:
Saturday, February 28 •  8:00 – 9:45am
Saturday, March 28 •  8:00 – 9:45am
Saturday, April 25 •  8:00 – 9:45am

Changes and updates will be posted on our website, at http://birdsofvermont.org/events.php, if needed and when possible.