February Bird Monitoring Walk

Northern Cardinal female. ©2011 Laura Waterhouse

Join our monthly monitoring walk to record birds on the Museum property. Learn something new, share what you know, or both!

All birders (current, experienced, newbie and would-be!) welcome! Most fun for adults, older children. Please bring your own binoculars, dress for weather. We go out the last Saturday of every month.

Max: 10 people • waitlist available
Free, suggested donation $5 – $10
Registration required.  Call (802) 434-2167 or register online:


(Photo: Female Northern Cardinal. Used by permission of the photographer.)

The Great Backyard Bird Count

black-capped chickadee eyes black oil birdseed in the platform feeder in fall-winter

Friday – Monday, February 18-21, 2022 • All Over the World

With a friend or one your own, watching one bird or counting hundreds, join a worldwide community-science and conservation project. All you have to do is observe for 15 minutes and submit your observation(s). Here are few more details from https://www.birdcount.org/participate/ :

Step 1 – Decide where you will watch birds.

Step 2 – Watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over the four days, February 18-21, 2022.

Step 3 – Count all the birds you see or hear within your planned time/location and use the best tool for sharing your bird sightings:

For more info: http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Ask a Naturalist: Owls

Local naturalists answer your questions about owls in Vermont (and possibly beyond)! 

Whooo’s interested in owls? Lots of us! Listen to and ask questions about these astonishing predators. Birders and ornithologists from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas answer your questions.

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont at https://vt.audubon.org/events/ask-naturalist-all-about-owls or call  (802 434-3068) or the Museum (802 434-2167) to get the info you need to sign in.

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions about owl senses, feathers, adaptations, habitat, prey and more are all welcome.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Ask a Naturalist: Bird Feeding and Birds in Winter

Seven Eastern Bluebirds at a water dish. Photo by Dana Ono for/at the Great Backyard Bird Count

Local naturalists answer your questions about birding in winter! 

The next  in the series from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas ! Ask A Naturalist brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This is an online free event; please register with Audubon Vermont at [ Link Coming Soon ].

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions on migration, hibernation, winter, wildlife, etc are all welcome topics.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Through the Window: March 2021

White-breasted nuthatch in profile, upside-down but head lifted, on a half-empty suet cage.
White-breasted nuthatch on suet, March 2011, Birds of Vermont Museum. Photo taken through window.

We had rather a good number of visitors (by appointment) as we worked away on the behind-the-scenes things we do (preparing for opening in spring, if all goes well). One of our month’s highlights wasn’t birds at all, but lady beetles! You can read more about them here: https://birdsofvermont.org/2021/03/12/lady-beetles-in-vermont-j-pupko/

But back to birds… quite the exciting mix!

Continue reading “Through the Window: March 2021”

Ask a Naturalist: Birding in Winter

Seven Eastern Bluebirds at a water dish. Photo by Dana Ono for/at the Great Backyard Bird Count

Local naturalists answer your questions about birding in winter! 

The next  in the series from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas ! Ask A Naturalist brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This is an online free event; please register with Audubon Vermont at https://act.audubon.org/a/ask-naturalist

This episode we are excited to share an upcoming community science opportunity that happens every February: the Great Backyard Bird Count! Other topics might include birding in winter and the on-goings of nature and animals at this point in winter when the days start getting a little longer.

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions on migration, hibernation, winter, wildlife, etc are all welcome topics.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so from generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Audubon Vermont

Birds of Vermont Museum

VT Herp Atlas

Through the Window: January 2021

Black-capped Chickadee and Dark-eyed Junco in winter. The Chickadee is perched on a half-fallen dried goldenrod stem on the left; the Junco is underneath he stem on the right. There are some forsythia stems in the background and snow covers the ground. Digiscoped iPhone photo by K. Talmage and used by permission.
Black-capped Chickadee and Dark-eyed Junco in winter. Digiscoped iPhone photo by K. Talmage and used by permission.

One thing we love about January is the potential for surprises. Irruptions, mutli-species flocks, or interesting marks in the snow can all happen. Which bird might we get to see this month? Will we be lucky enough to see it from the window? Will there be many? Which ones would we expect and not see after all?  Each possibility is a delight.

Seen from our Windows in January

Continue reading “Through the Window: January 2021”