Nestlings Find Nature

A young child in an orange shirt reaches out to touch the foot of a raptor

Explore nature with Allison! What is a bird? How do feathers work? What else is flying in our gardens? What do flowers look like up close?

These and other questions lead our exploration of nature around the Museum. Each week is different!

Designed for kids ages 4 – 8, siblings welcome.

Please sign up in advance with a click or tap:

Or call 802 434-2167.

Nestlings Find Nature

a young child looks through a stereoscope.

Explore nature with Allison! What is a bird? How do feathers work? What else is flying in our gardens? What do flowers look like up close? How about an egg?

These and other questions lead our exploration of nature around the Museum. Each week is different!

Designed for kids ages 4 – 8, siblings welcome.

Please sign up in advance with a click or tap:

Or call 802 434-2167 to register.

Nestlings Find Nature

Canada Darner (Aeshna canadensis) on child's hand

Explore nature with Allison! What is a bird? How do feathers work? What else is flying in our gardens? What do flowers look like up close?

These and other questions lead our exploration of nature around the Museum. Each week is different!

Designed for kids ages 4 – 8, siblings welcome.

Please sign up in advance: tap or click :


or call 802 434-2167.

Ask a Naturalist: Ticks, Mosquitos, and Blackflies

A map of Vermont with red dots showing locations of mosquito traps in 2019 in the state.

Local naturalists answer your questions about some small, annoying, yet important invertebrates of Vermont! 

The April session of Ask-a-Naturalist, from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas gives you the chance to learn new and fascinating things about some small creatures we normally just brush off.

Do you know how many different kinds of mosquitoes we have in Vermont? And that some don’t bother humans at all? How about ticks, and when to worry about which diseases? Have you seen “Blackflies: defenders of Vermont” on a T-shirt, and wondered what roles blackflies play in our ecosystems? Join this session and find out more!

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont at https://act.audubon.org/a/ask-a-naturalistmosquitoesticksflies


Bring us your questions and curiosity!

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so because of generous donors. If you can, please donate to one our organizations:

Thank you, and see you soon!

Ask a Naturalist: Amphibians

Red eft (tiny orange salamander) climbing over a single brown pine needle on a forest floor.

Local naturalists answer your questions about amphibians in Vermont! 

The March 2022 session of Ask-a-Naturalist, from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This episode we are excited to share all sort of observations and questions and even answers about some of our favorite animals: salamanders, frogs, and toads.

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont (802 434-3068) or the Museum (802 434-2167) to get the info you need to sign in.

Bring us your questions and curiosity!

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so because of generous donors. If you can, please donate to one our organizations:
Birds of Vermont Museum
Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas
Audubon Vermont

Thank you, and see you soon!

p.s. this event was originally scheduled for March 10th but has been moved to March 16th.

Ask a Naturalist: Owls

Local naturalists answer your questions about owls in Vermont (and possibly beyond)! 

Whooo’s interested in owls? Lots of us! Listen to and ask questions about these astonishing predators. Birders and ornithologists from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas answer your questions.

This is an online free event. Please register with Audubon Vermont at https://vt.audubon.org/events/ask-naturalist-all-about-owls or call  (802 434-3068) or the Museum (802 434-2167) to get the info you need to sign in.

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions about owl senses, feathers, adaptations, habitat, prey and more are all welcome.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

Ask a Naturalist: Bird Feeding and Birds in Winter

Seven Eastern Bluebirds at a water dish. Photo by Dana Ono for/at the Great Backyard Bird Count

Local naturalists answer your questions about birding in winter! 

The next  in the series from Audubon Vermont, Birds of Vermont Museum, and Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas ! Ask A Naturalist brings naturalists from our organizations to talk directly to you about what is happening outside.

This is an online free event; please register with Audubon Vermont at [ Link Coming Soon ].

While we can talk generally amongst ourselves about what is exciting outside during our long winters, this program will work best if you bring a question or two (tuning in to listen is also ok)! Questions on migration, hibernation, winter, wildlife, etc are all welcome topics.

We love hosting free programs, and are able to do so thanks to generous donors like you! Please consider a donation to one of our organizations:

the Big Sit!

A Stanley brand 25' metal measuring tape; a pair of black binoculars; a bag of Birds and Beans coffee (scarlet tanager dark roast). All three item are line d up on a wooden railing, with green foliage behind them.

The most relaxed birding around. And around and around …

How many birds can we identify from a 17-foot diameter circle from sunrise to sunset? Can we beat last year’s record?

This is a great long-running community science project. Pledges and donations welcome.

We are observing from Dawn to Dusk. The Museum is open from 10am – 4pm. Masks required when inside the Museum, and recommended when less that 6 feet apart outdoors.

Call or email to ask about joining the observation team.

For much more info, see https://www.thebigsit.org/ .

Check out the reports from previous years: 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

several birders standing during a Big Sit event
What is it? Birders focus during the Big Sit.

Insects of the Day

A stonefly in a glass jar is held toward the camera by a young white man

Which wonderful, weird, and wild insects are out during the day? Explore the museum grounds with James Grant, wildlife photographer.

Bring  magnifying glasses and an insect net if you have one. Do bring your water bottle and dress for outdoors.

Stay after the walk for lemonade in the tree house.

$5 suggested donation
Max: 10 people • waitlist available


Meet in the parking lot of the Museum.
Masks recommended when within 6′ of other people (required indoors)

If it is raining that day, please call the Museum (802 434-2167) to see if we have rescheduled.
(For evening insects, come to our Moth Walk on August 27).

Spring Ephemerals Walk

trout lily (yellow bloom on thin green stem; mottled leaf from base). Photo by K. Talmage and used by permission.

Early blooming wildflowers pop up from their winter slumber once the snow and cold retreat from the woods. Their presence is fleeting since these plants only bloom, undergo pollination, and produce seed in the brief period when sunlight reaches the forest floor before trees leaf out. In this part of the Northeast, we may expect to find up to a dozen species of colorful, delicate-looking, yet hardy, beauties.

Enjoy this spring walk with Museum Educator Allison Gergely.

Please dress for weather. Face masks required when we are within 6 feet of each other.

Please register in advance and get a confirmation using this link or https://www.eventbrite.com/e/spring-ephemerals-walk-registration-150091781559 or click/tap this button:



Max: 5 people

Free, suggested donation $10

If you are a family group with more than 5 members, please contact us.

If the walk fills, but there’s enough interest, we may be able to schedule more walks. Call or email museum@birdsofvermont.org, or call (802) 434-2167.

#NatureWalk #SpringInVermont #SpringEphemerals