June Bird Monitoring Walk

Looking down on one (blue) Red-winged Blackbird egg in nest, with cattail stems surrounding and supporting nest. (copyright E. Talmage and used by permission)

All birders (current, experienced, newbie and would-be!) welcome!Attend our monthly monitoring walk outdoors on the Museum’s trails in forest and meadow.

Most fun for adults, older children. Please bring your own binoculars, dress for weather. Face masks required when we are within 6 feet of each other. We go out the last Saturday of every month.

Max: 12 people
Suggested donation $10 – $15
Registration required.


(Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March)

Photo: Single Red-winged Blackbird egg. Photo © copyright E. Talmage and used by permission.

Early Birders Morning Walk

Silhouette of thrush on a branch with green foliage in background.

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week, Nate Sharp from VCE leads the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15
Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills


Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

4 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

Photograph of thrush copyright © 2007 J. Comeau and used by permission.

Early Birders Morning Walk

Museum members on a bird walk

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week, Ali Wagner will be leading the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15
Max: 12 people • waitlist available



Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

5 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

Early Birders Morning Walk

Photo of Catbird surrounded by green foliage. copyright J. Comeau and used by permission.

Spring mornings are terrific for birding. Join us for a walk led by experienced birders.

Who’s singing, calling, nesting, or flying around the Birds of Vermont Museum? Discover birds on an early morning ramble in the Museum’s forest and meadows. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds. This week Becky Giroux will be leading the walk.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Early mornings are often damp with dew and boots are definitely in order. Don’t forget bug spray/tick repellent!

Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Suggested donation: $10-$15



Max: 12 people • waitlist available if walk fills

Masks recommended inside the Museum. (We will update this listing with any changed COVID-19 precautions as we get closer to the date.)

4 people (seen from back) birding with binoculars in a ferny clearing in a spring forest

May Bird Monitoring Walk

Birders in early spring, looking at trees that are not fully leafed out.

All birders (current, experienced, newbie and would-be!) welcome! Attend our monthly monitoring walk outdoors on the Museum’s trails in forest and meadow.

Most fun for adults, older children. Please bring your own binoculars, dress for weather. Tick repellent and water bottles are recommended.

Max: 12 people
Suggested donation $10 – $15



Face masks recommended inside the museum.
We go out the last Saturday of every month. Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March.

April Bird Monitoring Walk

Photo: Fox Sparrow photographed by Erin Talmage, © 2019 and used by permission.

All birders —current, experienced, newbie and would-be— welcome! Most fun for adults, older children.

Please bring your own binoculars and dress for the weather. We recommend bringing tick repellent and a water bottle. Face masks required inside the museum.

Max: 10 people
Free, suggested donation $5 – $10 (pay what you can)




Outdoors

We go out the last Saturday of every month.. Walks start at 7:30 am April – August; 8am September – March

Photo: Fox Sparrow photographed by Erin Talmage, ©copyright  2019 and used by permission.

See it. Sketch it. Bird It.

nature journaling and sketching materials

Get ready for spring birding with this interactive program.

Learn techniques for observing, describing, sketching, and identifying birds that will immediately help you become a better birder.

All you need is a willingness to make marks—we supply pencils, paper, models, and identification guidance. (You are welcome to bring your own sketchbook if you prefer, of course!)




Suggested: $10 – $30 (pay what you can; includes museum admission)

Recommended for older children and adults

Carving shown is a Red-breasted Nuthatch, carved by Bob Spear.
Books pictured include Sibley’s Field Guide to Birds, Law’s Guide to Drawing Birds, and Johnson’s First Steps: Sketching and Drawing.

 

Full Moon Snowshoe Walk

A young person glances at the photographerwhile appearing to hold the full moon between their thumb and index finger. The moon is rising above curved hills in the background. The sky is dark blue and the person and hills are almost silhouetted.

Come with us as night falls over the Museum’s evening trails. Bring your snowshoes (several local libraries allow you to check out a pair for free!) and a flashlight. We will look, listen, and perhaps talk about surviving winter, early spring, nocturnal creatures, stars…

Dress to be outdoors and meet at the Museum’s entrance. If weather permits, we will have a fire and hot cocoa outside at the end of our walk.

Walk led by Erin Talmage, Museum Director and Wildlife Biologist. FYI, sunset is 5:47 pm in Hinesburg.

Recommended: red plastic to cover the lens of your flashlight.

Suggested donation: $10 – $30 (pay what you can) • You may make your donation online or reserve your place for free and donate at the door.

Max: 10 people • Register here or call (802) 434-2167 to confirm your spot.