Race Around Birds 2021

A trail map showing the route and laps for the Race Around Birds.

The Birds of Vermont Museum is hosting the second annual Race Around Birds trail run! There are two options for runners (and walkers), and you can even do both:

Race Day run: Saturday, November 6th, at 10a.m. This is a typical trail run, although there is both a one-lap and two-lap option. We can welcome up to 50 runners.

On-Your-Own (Virtual) Race: choose a day between October 23 and November 5th, run one or two laps, and record your time on the paper forms (available at the Museum’s front door).

Race results are in, and posted in our blog.

To Register

While registering is free, we encourage donations to cover the cost of post-race snacks and water. You may register for Race Day (group race), Virtual (self-timed) race, or both.


Course Description

This is a trail race with some steep uphill climbs. Some segments are more like single-track mountain trails. This is a HARD course.

One lap or two? There are two options, short and long, using the same course (trails): a one-lap 3.6-mile race, and a two-lap 7.2-mile race. (Distances are approximate.)

The course is well-marked and you will return to the Museum in the middle of each lap. There are no supplies and no first aid stations on the course. Bathrooms and water are available only if the Museum is open (Wednesdays through Sundays, 10am – 4pm, in October only).

The course is essentially a loop on each side of the road. Think of it as a figure 8 (although the loop on the north side of the creek is more convoluted than a simple loop).

If you are doing the short race, you will run the course once (lap one uses  green numbers on the map). For the longer race, you cover the course twice, but on the second pass you run the opposite direction (lap two is labelled in purple on the map).

How It Works

You may run or walk the course.

On the November 6th Race Day, runners will start at 10 a.m.

For the On-Your-Own (Virtual) Race, runners and walkers may come to the Museum at any time from daylight to dusk from October 23 to November 5. No dogs and no nights. You may run (or walk) the course multiple times on different days, in order to improve your times, and you may enter both the short (one-lap) and long (two-lap) race. You may run in groups of up to three or four.

For this option, you will keep track of your own start and finish times. Time-keeping forms will be in a marked box to the left of the Museum’s front door. Fill out a form for each day you race. Then, when you’re ready to run, take a map (if you needed), get to the start line (the west end of the parking lot by the parking sign),  mark your starting time, and GO! Afterward, fill in your finish time (you’ll finish on the other side of the road) and drop it in the box.

If you are running on Race Day, please carpool. We have limited parking.

But wait, there’s more!

If you share photos or comments online, we encourage you to use these hashtags:
#RaceAroundBirds #RaceAroundBirds2021 #birdsofvermontmuseum #runningisforthebirds #trailrace #virtualrace #huntingtonvt #trailrunning #trailrunner

Send questions to trailrunning@birdsofvermont.org!

Printable race packets (trail map, course notes, entry form, waiver) are available as PDFs:

Stories in the Forest: Summer Woods Walk

child (seen from back) doing leaf rubbing of fern

A story is a tale; a story is a floor in a structure. So, what stories exist to be found and told by a Vermont forest?

We know forests and woodlands presently cover about 75% of Vermont’s land area. From the time of glacial retreat to now, forests have regularly risen and fallen, influenced by the effects of climate conditions, natural disasters, and human activity.

How does a forest develop? What are its vertical and horizontal profiles? Which stories, or layers, define a maturing forest? Forest dwelling birds use different sections of the forest column to satisfy an array of needs. Which birds can be found in Vermont’s forests …and where? Look to the trees to find Stories in the Forest.

This family friendly walk introduces forests’ stories as stages and layers of distinctive plant growth and habitat. Explore the lives of trees, shrubs, birds, and other wildlife within a forest’s layers.



Please dress for weather.  Face masks recommended when we are within 6 feet of each other.

Max: 10 people • waitlist available if the walk fills

Free, suggested donation $10

If you are a family group with more than 5 members, please contact us.

If the walk fills, but there’s enough interest, we may be able to schedule more walks. Call or email museum@birdsofvermont.org, or call (802) 434-2167.

#NatureWalk #VermontForests #StoriesEverywhere #SummerInVermont #SummerStories

Partial birch log with sapsucker holes, on a forest floor

Stories in the Forest: Spring Woods Walk

a small cgrassy clearing in a forest, with white pines to the right and in the midground. Camel's Hump mountain is visible in the background, its pealk obscured by clouds.

Forests and woodlands cover about 75% of Vermont’s land area.  From the time of glacial retreat to now, forests have regularly risen and fallen, influenced by the effects of climate conditions, natural disasters, and human activity.

How does a forest develop? What are its vertical and horizontal profiles? Which stories, or layers, define a maturing forest? Forest-dwelling birds use different sections of the forest column to satisfy an array of needs. Which birds can be found in Vermont’s forests …and where?  Look to the trees to find Stories in the Forest.

Please dress for weather. Face masks required when we are within 6 feet of each other.

Please register in advance and get a confirmation  using this button:




Max: 5 people

Free, suggested donation $10

If you are a family group with more than 5 members, please contact us.

If the walk fills, but there’s enough interest, we may be able to schedule more walks. Call or email museum@birdsofvermont.org, or call (802) 434-2167.

#NatureWalk #VermontForests #StoriesEverywhere

 

Stories in the Forest: Fall Woods Walk

child in fall forest examining a log

Elementary age kids: come explore three woodland habitats in different stages of being: open shrub, young forest, and mature forest with Allison Gergely, Museum Educator.

Look up, down, over, across. We’ll observe and identify the general elements of each, and gain an understanding of the character of forest structure (vertical and horizontal). Through drawing, predicting, and “story telling”, we begin to understand the importance of forests as shelters, food sources, territorial regions, and resilient landscapes, each connected to our local wildlife.

Ages 6-10 yrs. with adult. • Great outing for a homeschool group, single family, or grandkids with their grandparent.

About 1.5 hour

Max: 6 people • ONE (1) space left
Masks: please bring them and wear them if within 6′ of each other.

$5 (free for Museum members)
MUST pre-register. Call 802-434-2167 / email museum@birdsofvermont.org

 

Race Around Birds

Race Around Birds Trail Map

The Birds of Vermont Museum is hosting a month-long “virtual” trail race on our trail system here at the Museum on Sherman Hollow Road in Huntington. Run on your own schedule! The race begins October 5 and ends November 1, 2020.

How It Works

You may run or walk the course. This is a “virtual” race where you will keep track of your own start and finish times. You may run (or walk) the course multiple times on different days, in order to improve your times, and you may enter both the short and long race. You may run in groups of up to three or four if you distance yourselves (as runners normally do).

Runners and walkers may come to the Museum at any time from daylight to dusk. No dogs and no nights.

Registration forms will be in a marked box to the left of the Museum’s front door. Fill out a form for each time you race. Then, when you’re ready, mark your starting time, leave your form, take a map and GO!

There is no charge for this, but donations are much appreciated! There are boxes for this on kiosks near trailheads or click on “Donate” here:

Course Description

This is a trail race with some steep uphill climbs. Some segments are more like single-track mountain trails. This is a HARD course.

There are two options, short and long, using the same course (trails): a one-lap 3.6-mile race, and a two-lap 7.2-mile race. (Distances are approximate.)

The course is well-marked and you will return to the Museum in the middle of each lap. There are no supplies and no first aid stations on the course. Bathrooms and water are available only if the Museum is open (Wednesdays through Sundays, 10am – 4pm).

The course is essentially a loop on each side of the road. Think of it as a figure 8 (although the loop on the north side of the creek is more convoluted than a simple loop).

If you are doing the short race, you will run the course once (labelled in green on the map). For the longer race, you cover the course twice, but on the second pass you run the opposite direction (labelled in purple on the map).

At the end, record your time and leave your form in the box for finishers.

Results will be announced the week of November 2.

If you share photos or comments online, we encourage you to use these hashtags:
#RaceAroundBirds #RaceAroundBirds2020 #birdsofvermontmuseum #runningisforthebirds #trailrace #virtualrace #huntingtonvt #trailrunning #trailrunner

Send questions to trailrunning@birdsofvermont.org!

Download the Trails Map PDF: https://birdsofvermont.org/docs/trail-map-for-race-web.pdf

Or the whole packet (trail map, course notes, entry form, waiver): http://birdsofvermont.org/docs/Race%20Around%20Birds-course-info-entry-form.pdf

This page may get updated with more images, forms, maps, and more — check back!

Exploring our trails and COVID-19

Yes, our trails are open! But we ask you to take extra precautions for now:

  • Please visit only if you live locally (within about 10 miles); current spread-prevention guidelines recommend this. If you are from farther away, we hope to see you later this year.
  • Please take extra care: we have limited or no cell service, and trails can be rough or uneven. Please don’t climb anything.
  • Please stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) from each other. Pass with care and extra room. Give each other even more room if it is windy or if you are breathing hard (we have some good slopes!).
  • Please only travel or hike with people you with whom you are already sharing isolation/quarantine/shelter-in-place.
  • Wash hands before and after your visit with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. If you don’t have soap and water, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching structures and do not share binoculars or phones if possible.
  • If you are not feeling well or have COVID-19 symptoms, please visit later when you are recovered.
  • Please, no pets. This is our policy for all of our trails, to protect ground-nesting and ground-foraging birds.
  • For additional information about staying safe while enjoying the outdoors, visit the State of Vermont’s website.
  • For further guidance about Vermont trail closures and COVID-19 safety in Vermont, review the VTGC / VTA Recreation and COVID-19 statement.