Through the Window: December 2012 … a little sparse

We were busy out and about, and had few visitors (a disadvantage of our “by appointment” season), so not so many observations. The female Grosbeak with the damaged wing continues to live nearby! You can find out more about her in October’s entry. Here’s the rest of our December list.

  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Mourning Dove
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Evening Grosbeak  (the female with the drooping wing was noted on December 22)
  • Northern Cardinal

Project Feederwatch started November 10th. We usually do our observations at lunch. This is a great project to do with kids. The Great Backyard Bird Count (in February) is another beginner-friendly (and expert-friendly!) citizen science project. We do that do, and the Museum will be open on February 16 so you can count, learn, and enjoy it with us.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: November 2012 Gets a Little Quieter

Our plucky female Grosbeak friend is still around! You can find out more about her in last month’s entry.

  • Evening Grosbeak (including the feamle with the injured wing. Still going!)
  • Blue JayTufted Titmouse
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Pine Siskin
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Ruffed Grouse
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Fox Sparrow (11/6/2012)
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Mourning Dove
  • Wild Turkey (usually 6-10, but we did see a flock of 23!)

Project Feederwatch started November 10th! We enjoy having our lunch while “standing watch”. When do you take your data?

Of course some Red and Gray squirrels appeared quite pleased to hoover up some of our corn and black oil seed from the ground.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: October 2012 with a Big Sit too

The Big Sit! event always boosts the size of the October list. Something about actually sitting around and watching for birds, instead of trying to notice them while you’re talking to other visitors…  Bold birds are the ones we didn’t record last month.

  • Blue Jay
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Evening Grosbeak*
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • American Crow
  • Mourning Dove
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Purple Finch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Sharp-shinned Hawk (caught something on October 19!)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Pine Siskins (more than 20!)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Wild Turkeys (a flock of 9)
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Song Sparrow? (10/12, observed by Jim O. Not bolded due to uncertainty, although Jim is an expert birder.)
  • Cedar Waxwing (during the Big Sit)
  • mystery Duck (a Big Sit observation–too silhouetted to identify properly)
  • Common Raven (also during the Big Sit!)
  • Rusty Blackbird (10/17)
  • Pileated Woodpecker (flew over 10/12)
  • Canada Geese (heard overhead 10/23)
  • American Robin (10/23)
  • Common Grackle (10/07)
  • Ruffed Grouse (in the crab apple tree 10/28)

*Observe? Or Act?

We observed several Evening Grosbeaks, male and female. One female seemed to have an injured right wing. Over the course of the month, she continued to make appearances, generally foraging on the ground and hopping back to shelter in the cedar hedge. However, one day she did fly—perhaps flutter is a more accurate verb—up into some shrubs as well. We saw her off and on through the end of October, and we wish her well. Her persistence does raise the question: what, if anything, should we do about her? Catch her? Send her to rehab? Observe her without interference?

Also,  Project Feederwatch starts November 10th! Are you ready? We are!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board and many identification guides, and several feeders outside on a single, bear-resistant pole, as well as a small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: September 2012 Bye-bye, (Humming) Birdie

Last of the Hummingbirds! We’re confident that our feeding of them didn’t slow their departure; rather, feeding seems to supplement migrating birds rather than delay them.  If you’re curious about what we saw in high summer, you can see that list too. Bold birds are the ones we didn’t record last month.

  • American Goldfinch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • House Finch (female)
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female last seen 9/15/2012)
  • Blue Jay
  • Northern Cardinal
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • Purple Finch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • American Crow
  • Evening Grosbeak
  • Wild Turkey
  • Cooper’s Hawk
  • Northern Flicker

Some typical (and observed) wee neighbors:

  • Red squirrel
  • Gray Squirrel
  • Chipmunks

You can always compare our informal list to other area records on eBird—that’s where we record the observations from our monthly bird monitoring walks (thanks to our wonderful volunteer MM) . We will be part of Project Feederwatch this winter of course, as well as the Great Backyard Bird Count.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board and many identification guides, and several feeders outside on a single, bear-resistant pole, as well as a small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: July 2012 is for Fledglings

We list them on our white board in the order we see them (more or less, since the usually the first several are from the first day of the month). We put the ones not seen last month in bold.

  • Common Grackle
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Mourning Dove
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • Blue Jay
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • American Crow
  • Baltimore Oriole
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • American Goldfinch
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Northern Goshawk (and on 7/23, observed it taking a Mourning Dove!)
  • Black-billed Cuckoo (by the pond)
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (nest and fledglings in the tree beyond the picnic table, later filmed by Linda Hurd for us)
  • House Finch
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • Indigo Bunting
  • Purple Finch

Some other intriguing and special notes:

  • Red squirrel
  • Gray Squirrel
  • Chipmunks
  • Sphinx Moth (at first mistaken for a Hummingbird!)
  • and a baby Skunk

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board and many identification guides, and several feeders outside on a single, bear-resistant pole, as well as a small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.