Common Grounds: 2018 community art show

Amy Alfieri's -A Hat Is No Home- block print. Copyright © 2018 and used by permission

Common Grounds is our art show in recognition of 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and its conservation consequences. Experience over 40 bird-focused artworks connecting the themes of commonality, conservation, migration, and coordination among peoples, species, places, and time.

Show is open from May 1 to October 31 • Included with Museum admission

About the theme “Common Grounds”

Continue reading “Common Grounds: 2018 community art show”

Call to Artists: Common Grounds

 Common Grounds

A Call to Artists from the Birds of Vermont Museum
in recognition of 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and its conservation consequences

Birds link us.  We need the same things: food, water, air, places to live. We humans have sometimes used laws to protect those needs we have in common. In 1918, the US Congress put into place the Migratory Bird Treaty Act—one of the first laws setting limits on what we could and could not do specifically with respect to migratory birds. Since then, we’ve asked new questions, discovered new ramifications, and come to new understandings about what the work of conservation entails. In order for the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to be successful, people have to work together across geographic, political, socioeconomic, and ecological boundaries. We need to find—or create—common ground. What does that look like? Continue reading “Call to Artists: Common Grounds”

Art Review: ‘Birding by the Numbers,’ Birds of Vermont Museum

Most art shows can be viewed without particular attention to their settings, but ‘Birding by the Numbers’ is inseparable from its locale. The Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington organized the community art exhibit to celebrate its 30th anniversary. …Numbers are the key to ornithology… The artists’ responses to this intersection of ideas range from literal to literary.

Source: Art Review: ‘Birding by the Numbers,’ Birds of Vermont Museum

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Call to Artists: Birding By the Numbers

Birding by the Numbers

A Call to Artists from the Birds of Vermont Museum in celebration of our 30th Anniversary

We at the Museum like to say we are “where natural history meets art.” But flip through the files of time while birding in the last 30 years… what would ornithology be without math? What new facts and figures about feathered phenomena do you most appreciate? Join us as we play with birds and numbers!

We seek bird-focused art that incorporates a feeling for number with artistic expression. We are open to any media. Let your art—from imaginary to irrational, with birds silly and significant—populate our creative space!

Here is a tiny fraction of funky factoids to tickle your fancy and perhaps illustrate what we mean: Continue reading “Call to Artists: Birding By the Numbers”

“In Layers: The Art of the Egg ”: Call to Artists from the Birds of Vermont Museum

Be part of our 2016 eggs-hibition! Do you create? Do you have a thing for birds, science, or conservation? We do too.

The Birds of Vermont Museum seeks art and craft that focus on the beauty, biology, and essence of eggs for our 2016 season Art Exhibit, In Layers: The Art of the Egg. We’re hoping to hatch feelings of passion, delight, commitment, and discovery with this art (watch for additional activities and displays about oology during the season as well).

The show runs from May 1 to October 31 in the Museum’s multi-purpose room, halls, and foyer. Most art will be hung on the walls. We have shelf space for three-dimensional works and some ceiling space if your work is suitable there. Feel free to visit and scope out the options! We are open to all sorts of media and we strive, in choosing works, for a harmonious variety. Continue reading ““In Layers: The Art of the Egg ”: Call to Artists from the Birds of Vermont Museum”

Season’s Tweetings

Season's Tweetings from the Birds of Vermont Museum 2015
Season’s Tweetings from the Birds of Vermont Museum

Art of Birds, clockwise from upper left: needle-felted Owls (Susi Ryan’s class); Flood Birds (carved by David Tuttle from trees washed out during the 2013 flood); Eagle quilt (Carol McDowell for the Birds of a Fiber exhibit); Northern Parula (wood carving by Bob Spear); Scarlet Tanager ornaments (carved by Dick Allen and painted by Kir Talmage); Wren (carving by Elizabeth Spinney)

The Art and Artists of “Birds of A Fiber” (2015 Community Art Exhibit)

In selecting art for the Birds of a Fiber exhibit, we hoped to allow the variety of media to hint at the diversity of birds. We had hooked rugs and traditional penny rugs, photographs rendered in cross-stitch, crocheted and fabric sculptures, needle felted miniatures, multimedia collages, paper sculpture, and quilts.

We hope you had a chance to see some of these works for yourself! There is not enough room to show all the works here in our mini slideshow. However, all the artists are listed below.

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  • Ann Wetzel, penny rug
  • Carol McDowell, quilted art
  • Dawn Littlepage, textile collage
  • Elizabeth Spinney, crochet
  • Erin Talmage, recycled paper
  • Eve Gagne, cross stitch
  • Kir Talmage, needle felted wool
  • Marya Lowe, quilted art
  • Morgan Barnes, needle felted wool
  • Robin Hadden, rug hooking
  • Katherine Guttman, mixed media (fiber, glass, and metal)
  • Nancy Tomczak, mixed media (fiber and watercolor)
  • Girl Quest participants, fiber birds/mixed media

 

Progress on the Museum entrance way: cover plants

After laying in rock and grading the slope just-so, the stream bank crew put down netting to reduce erosion, and it was seeded with a one-year “cover crop”. We’ll replant perennials and more next spring.

Erosion netting in place, October 7, 2105
Erosion netting in place, September 26

The cover crop sprouted quite quickly, which encouraged and delighted us.

Can you see the little sprouts? Click to zoom in, perhaps.
Can you see the little sprouts? This is about October 8. Click to zoom in, perhaps.

Yesterday’s and this morning’s light snow doesn’t seem to have bothered the little plants at all!

Protecting the stream bank with netting and plants.   Protecting the stream bank with netting and plants.

Protecting the stream bank with netting and plants, October 18. Click to see these larger (it’s worth it!)

Continue reading “Progress on the Museum entrance way: cover plants”